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November 20, 2011

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Tom

Hi,
I agree, but there is nothing new under the sun here.
This could not be expected to come from the programmers but should be introduced by the managers and organizational standards.
The more important thing after collecting those metrics regularly is to do something useful with them and use them for improvement.
T.

Eugene Jorov

@Tom: I'm glad this post was not a big news for you. This probably means you know the theory well. Maybe it also achieved its other goal - reminding folks out there that now is as good time as any to start pushing your team forward. Could you share what metrics you collect about your team?

Tom

I am not measuring any such metrics right now since I am not managing any development teams :(
Back in the days I did, I mostly used bugs/module, code reviews, code/design consistency, effort estimation vs. actual effort, effort vs. progress.
Must admit I don’t have any conclusive conclusion regarding this area… Though it is plain and clear this is something beneficial, in reality for this to actually be beneficial you should get over two major obstacles:
1. Regularly and systematically collecting those metrics
2. Periodically and systematically analyzing the collected information
Most struggles to keep with step 1, and the ones who pass to step 2 mostly just end up with a regularly and systematically ever growing banks of unused information.
I myself tried to take step 2 into completion every quarter or mid-year but though had some very enlightening realizations and understandings that led to major improvement can’t claim full success.
If you are not going to invest time and effort analyzing the information – don’t collect.
I am not sure of the usefulness of some of your suggested metrics by the way such as build time and function/class length. I think you mixed two different topics here (coding best practices and metrics).
T.

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